Friday, March 12, 2010

JESS LUCAS & SEAN BAILEY
CURRENTLY AT NEON PARC






APPLYING YOURSELF AND BREAKING DOWN



Every day I have to cleanse in order to manually ‘take off the day’. My cleanser actually has that on it’s bottle as its’ characterising slogan.

Both artists have reached a uniting point similar in meaning here. They both literally capture the process and time spent in applying and removing anything, which is something most of us face habitually on a day-to-day basis. It’s confronting to become aware of your presence and these actions- paint to canvas or even to face, but it also makes you who you are. Some of these processes are so familiar that it seems more ridiculous and confronting to stop them, than to go on proceeding maintaining them.

I put this on and then I feel normal

I have been in situations where I’ve gone around speaking to people all day and then realised at the end of the day that I look like Marge when Homer shoots her with the make-up gun that’s set on whore. In some lights I seem flawless, only to catch my cake-face in some brutal truth-telling mirror out on the town three hours into the evening. My perception of reality totally changes and the thing that was meant to be making me feel “better” makes me feel weird and displaced.
It seems that both artists’ paintings act as similar transformational surfaces, capturing fleeting moments of release. These moments however are then polarised by them into moving and accidental balanced states, like a look-in to an un-blocked equilibrium.

You go to look at a certain point within either artist’s work only to find that you can’t focus amongst the complete matter of paint and detail of their marks. There is something underneath we can’t quite reach that allows you to look at the work not just a flat painted surface but as an idea and aesthetic that’s free enough to celebrate totally but has the weight of being built up over time. The same could be said of those personally defining everyday marks we make. Practice, procedure and re-application often defines us in our world and we hope that enough people perceive the final result how we intended them to initially.

In this case though, it seems as though the artists are aware of this as a-sometimes possibility and an ok impossibility. They are sure about one thing though, and here they have turned it into something staggering, stimulating and skillfully strange- uncertainty in life and being more than ok with that.

Harriet Kate Morgan

1 comment:

Felix Curds said...

Ah yes, I know people who won't look in the mirror without a little something on their face or whatever. hmmm...

Thanks for sharing these works!